Category Archives: Linux

DevCon IV, The Resurrection: Part 2

So, after wolfing down a lunch of Czech dumplings from the ample buffet and walking past the Giveth guy (who I didn’t know at the time and just thought was wearing a bad Halloween costume), I headed to the talk by Golem, out of curiosity since I had no idea who they were. Plus, since we were in Prague, it seemed appropriate. And after a few confused minutes, I finally got it. Wow.

Basically, Golem was offering a secure platform that decentralized the notion of buying and selling cycles of computing power. Instead of AWS EC2 and Azure VM, you could purchase your power from anonymous sources around the world. And on the other side of the coin, you could become an independent vendor, offering your computers as computing providers on the network. As a vendor, you’d just install their software on your machines. Of course, one would think of all the possible questions about trust on such a platform, but it seemed that Golem had those bases covered.

And how does Ethereum fit into all of this madness? It’s the transaction-based layer of the platform, of course! All agreements and purchases would occur within the Ethereum blockchain. How beautiful is that: one decentralized platform supporting another! After that lecture, I was hungry to discover what other projects were being developed with Ethereum in mind. So, where to next?!

Advertisements

Quick Tangent: It’s Probably for the Best

So, it’s been a while since I talked about indoor navigation. It’s one of those things that I always come back to, especially since that idea for the ghost game always comes back to me now and again. After a conversation with a hardware grad student in a PhD program, I got excited about the idea again and went looking once more for a software solution. As it turns out, Microsoft wants in on the action. After playing with it for a while, though, there’s only one problem: much like other indoor navigation solutions, it doesn’t work exactly.

In my apartment several stories up and which occupies only one floor, I will walk several feet. Then it will suddenly prompt me, asking me which floor I’m headed to. Apparently, it thinks that I’m in an elevator or on an escalator.

With all the difficulties amassed between AR and navigation, it’s no wonder that Project Tango was closed by Google. And it’s no wonder that this Microsoft navigation project apparently hasn’t been updated for a year now. After all, AR and indoor navigation are tough subjects to tackle.

So, it’s refreshing to hear that Microsoft might be rethinking some of its past approaches. After having experimented with their earlier iterations of Windows IoT, I found it an interesting foray for Microsoft. However, I didn’t really believe that it’d be adopted by manufacturers and (especially) developers. It seems that Microsoft has had the same realization recently, and it’s now pursuing a new project to revamp their IoT (and mobile, to some degree) portfolio called Azure Sphere. Now, this initiative could maybe breathe new life into some of that confused tech. If somebody out there creates a kit for Azure Sphere, I’m a taker. I’m looking at you, Adafruit!